The Wikipedia Thought Police.

Google for “wikipedia thought police” has 4,000 hits.

Google search for “displacement current” had 200,000 hits. Wikipedia was no. 1, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displacement_current    and Ivor Catt was no. 2 http://www.electromagnetism.demon.co.uk/z001.htm , published in 1978. (Surprisingly, it sometimes suddenly drops to no. 19, and then back to no. 2.)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Chetvorno  “My name is Chris Burks. I concentrate on writing and improving articles in my areas of interest: electronics, physics, horology, history of technology, pacifism, and international folk dance. Lately I have specialized in making technical, scientific and engineering articles more understandable for the general reader,”

He has little time to study electromagnetic theory, given that he also has to handle physics, horology, history of technology, pacifism, and international folk dance

However, he did contribute to the Wikipedia article “Displacement Current” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displacement_current  in spite of his many other “commitments”. He aborted my attempt to point out a flaw in classical, text book theory in the “Talk” page. Since my attempts to insert anything in the “Article” proper have been quickly removed for a many years, I tried the “Talk” page. The third paragraph below is my attempt, and the Thought Police responded with the fourth paragraph, which restates the text book version of the subject, dismissing the point I made as “not important”. He writes; “Lately I have specialized in making technical, scientific and engineering articles more understandable for the general reader. He correctly brought my entry “back into the fold”, the fold being the text book version which has survived for more than a century. His behaviour is in line with the founder of Wikipedia, who has said he wants “peer reviewed material”. It is true that my article “Displacement Current” http://www.ivorcatt.org/icrwiworld78dec1.htm could not be published in a peer reviewed journal. It was published in Wireless World . However, it is usually no. 2 hit in Google. Should there be a hyperlink to it from the Wikipedia page “Displacement Current”? My 1978 article http://www.ivorcatt.org/icrwiworld78dec1.htm says “The flaw in this [text book] model is revealed when we notice that the electric current entered the capacitor at one point only on the capacitor plate.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displacement_current

“Origins of Displacement Current[edit]

The web link for Maxwell's 1861 paper 'On Physical Lines of Force' was provided. You can clearly see that displacement current was first introduced at equation (111), and you can clearly read about the context. The original Wikipedia article claimed that displacement current first appeared in the 1865 paper 'A Dynamical theory of the Electromagnetic Field'. This is not true. That's why the amendment was made. 11/2/07 (124.217.34.54 07:50, 11 February 2007 (UTC))

I fixed the date, thanks. But I'm not clear on the reasons for your other changes. You removed the introduction, replacing it with some history of displacement current, so I reverted that and some other changes, like removing the mathematical necessity section. Pfalstad 17:36, 11 February 2007 (UTC)

The second diagram in the Article shows electric current entering the capacitor. It should also show the electric current spreading out across the capacitor plate. http://www.ivorcatt.org/icrwiworld78dec1.htm ; http://www.ivorcatt.co.uk/x18j41.pdf . This current should be discussed in the article. Ivor Catt, February 2014 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.164.171.64 (talk) 23:20, 21 February 2014 (UTC) The second diagram in the Article wrongly shows the electric field as uniform. It is not. http://www.ivorcatt.org/icrwiworld78dec1.htm . Ivor Catt, 1 March 2014 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.164.171.64 (talk) 21:54, 1 March 2014 (UTC)

It is not important for the demonstration how the charge is distributed on the capacitor plate. The only relevant point is that current is passing through integration surface S1 but not through S2. Without the displacement current term in the Ampere-Maxwell equation, the equation would be inconsistent; the result of the surface integral would depend on which surface you chose spanning the contour δS. And (disregarding fringing fields) the electric field between the plates will be substantially uniform as long as the capacitor is not charged so quickly that the voltage changes appreciably during the light travel time between the center and the periphery of the plate. --ChetvornoTALK

       01:21, 2 March 2014 (UTC)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Chetvorno

My name is Chris Burks. I concentrate on writing and improving articles in my areas of interest: electronics, physics, horology, history of technology, pacifism, and international folk dance. Lately I have specialized in making technical, scientific and engineering articles more understandable for the general reader, as I feel WP has a problem in this area.

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more understandable for the general reader” (above). That is exactly what he did with his comment on my entry in “Talk”. The general reader needs unsullied material which reproduces the dogma in text books. The whole point of my item was that there was something wrong with the text book story.

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Articles Chris Burks say he has been involved in.

Articles I have rewritten[edit]

Verge escapement | Balance wheel | Cavendish experiment | Torsion spring | Glucydur | Elinvar | Gyromax | Torsion pendulum clock | Meter (electronics) | Bob (physics) | Fusee (horology) | Mainspring | Pendulum clock | Repeater (horology) | Ratchet (device) | Barrel (horology) | Mechanical watch | Electrophorus | Electroscope | Stepped Reckoner | Automatic watch | Wilberforce pendulum | Clockwork radio | Induction coil | Simple machine | Parasitic capacitance | Riefler escapement | Remontoire | Anchor escapement | Electrostatic induction | Pin pallet escapement | Bracket clock | Movement (clockwork) | Self-powered equipment | Crystal oven | Electromagnet | Saturation (magnetic) | Oudin coil | Crookes tube | Superconducting magnet | Utility pole | Distribution transformer | Observation | Background Radiation Equivalent Time | Barkhausen Stability Criterion | Kundt's tube | Schuler tuning | Node (physics) | Lecher lines | Mu-metal | Linear circuit | Pendulum | Cathode ray | Lodestone | Kater's pendulum | Shortt-synchronome clock | Salted bomb | Horn antenna | Parabolic antenna | Antenna aperture | RF front end | Antenna feed | Counterpoise (ground system) | Whip antenna | Screw (simple machine)| | Cassegrain antenna | A Perfect Spy | Electric clock | Optical flat | Mechanically powered flashlight | Project Sanguine | Evolved antenna | Offset dish antenna | Corner reflector | T-aerial | Proximity card | Ground plane | Corona ring | Ground dipole | Pravo | Peter Henlein | State (computer science) | Memory refresh | Attack model | Inclined plane | Motorboating (electronics)

Articles I have made substantial contributions to[edit]

Thermal efficiency | Harmonic oscillator | Watch | Escapement | Resonance | Quartz clock | Longcase clock | Crystal oscillator | Resonator | Atmos clock | Clock face | Tuning fork | Church bell | X-ray tube | X-ray | Electrical generator | Dictation machine | Typewriter | Dynamo | Colpitts oscillator | Clockmaker | Pocket watch | Astronomical clock | Striking clock | Complication (horology) | Intermediate frequency | Tesla coil | History of timekeeping devices | LC circuit | Clock | Weighing scale | Weight | Energy level | Double-slit experiment | Pulley | James Lick telescope | Hale telescope | Brownian ratchet | Lantern clock | Electric watch | Tourbillon | Cooper pair | Twin lead | Insulator (electrical) | Dosimeter | Ionizing radiation | Displacement current | Magnet | Coaxial cable | The Roads Must Roll | The Menace from Earth | Space Jockey (short story) | Kachina | Chindi | Rare earth magnet | Neodymium magnet | Alnico | Ferromagnetism | Charge conservation | Salisbury screen | Heterodyne | Cat's whisker detector | Crystal radio | Monopole antenna | Omnidirectional antenna | Helical antenna | Transmitter | Doppler effect | Electric bell | Doorbell | Magnetic domain | Electronic oscillator | Finite state machine | DSL modem | Semiconductor memory | Reductio ad absurdam | Buridan's ass | Interrupt | Megaphone | Curtain array | Inductor | Triode | AM broadcasting | Relaxation oscillator